Style D Trumpet English
Tuba Trumpet English

The Wurlitzer organ company built anywhere from two to five different styles of Trumpet depending on who you ask and how you define “different”. (See Brass Trumpet and French Trumpet.) One of their trumpets, used in their Style D model theatre organs, was tonally a cross between a Trumpet and a Tuba. Unlike other Wurlitzer trumpets which featured brass resonators, this one had resonators of Hoyt metal. As theatre organs have been broken up and reassembled by organ hobbyists, multiple trumpet stops have found their way into composite instruments. In some of these, the owners have used the name Tuba Trumpet to distinguish the Wurlitzer “Style D” trumpet from other trumpets. The name “Style D Trumpet” never appeared on a stop-tab, but is a name commonly used to distinguish it from other Trumpets. Wurlitzer invariably engraved simply “Trumpet” on their stop-tabs, regardless of the style. Strony writes:

A stop that was built only by Wurlitzer, and used in small instruments under 10 ranks. It was never included in larger instruments. The name comes from the fact that it was developed for the Style D model that had only six ranks.
Like many ranks used in smaller organs, the Style D Trumpet was a perfect compromise. It was an excellent cross between the brighter Brass Trumpet and the dark Tuba Horn. Because of these qualities, it blended well; and yet, it added brightness and weight at the same time.

The Barton and Link companies also reportedly made a Tuba Trumpet.


Strony[1]: Style D Trumpet. Private correspondence with PIPORG-L members.
Copyright © 2001 Edward L. Stauff, all rights reserved.
TubaTrumpet.html - Last updated 6 January 2002.
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