Quint Flute English

This name has been used for three different stops, two of which are described elsewhere under the synonyms Flute Quint and Nasard Flute. The third is described by Audsley:

A compound Quint Flute, 8 ft., has recently been introduced by Mr. George W. Till, of Philadelphia [Pennsylvania, USA], and inserted in the so-called Etherial Organ of the large Concert instrument in the Wanamaker Store, in Philadelphia. So far as our knowledge extends, this is the most noteworthy dual stop of 8 ft. pitch ever construted; and one that could only be inserted, under favorable conditions, in Concert-room Organs of the first magnitude. Its compound voice is of considerable grandeur, its tonality surpassing in depth and richness of color that of any other flute-toned stop known to have been produced up to the present time (1920).

The principal rank is a Clear Flute, 8 ft., formed of open wood pipes from CC to c4, to which are added twelve open metal pipes for octave coupling. The scale is large, the C pipe measuring, internally, 8 inches in width by 10 1/2 inches in depth. The subordinate rank is a Quint, 5-1/3 ft., formed of covered wood pipes from CC to f#2 - 43 notes, and open metal pipes from g2 to c5 - 30 notes, all yielding a normal tone. The stop speaks on wind of 25 inches pressure.

Irwin also mentions this stop: A truly compound Quint Flute may be heard in a few organs, made from two ranks such as an 8' Harmonic Flute and an open metal 5-1/3' of softer tone.

Other compound stops designed by George W. Till include Duophone, Nasard Flûte, Nasard Gamba, and Tierce Flute.

Compare with Quintflute and Quintflöte.

Bibliography

Audsley[1]: Quint Flute. Irwin[1]: Quint Flute.
 
Copyright © 1999 Edward L. Stauff, all rights reserved.
QuintFlute.html - Last updated 12 September 2000.
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